Nature

A powerful 7.0 magnitude earthquake hit Turkey and Greece on Friday afternoon, killing at least 19 people, causing buildings to crash down and triggering a “mini tsunami”. Magnitude 7.0 Earthquake The tremor’s magnitude, according to the United States Geological Survey (USGS) was at  7.00. Authorities in Turkey said it was 6.6.According to USGS, the quake
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Hello Nature readers, would you like to get this Briefing in your inbox free every day? Sign up here New Guinea singing dogs are related to Australian dingoes.Credit: Daniel Heuclin/NPL The largest-ever study of ancient dog genomes has revealed a lot about our four-legged friends. The analysis of more than two dozen Eurasian dogs suggests
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The merging of two black holes releases gravitational waves.Credit: Science Photo Library/Alamy Astronomers observed 39 cosmic events that released gravitational waves over a 6-month period in 2019 — a rate of more than one per week. The bounty, described in a series of papers published on 28 October, demonstrates how observatories that detect these ripples
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Countries have banded together to propose marine reserves to protect Antarctic krill species from global warming and overfishing. The cornerstone of the biologically diverse Antarctic Peninsula is the shrimp-like, small Antarctic krill. READ: Scientists Determine How Marsh Birds Survive Dangerous Hurricanes and Natural Disasters such as Hurricane Zeta The Importance of and Threats To Krill According to University of Colorado environmental scientist Cassandra Brooks, krill are the
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Scientists have learnt to produce the relatively unstable element lithium (pictured) inside a microscope, making the metal’s crystallization easy to observe. Credit: Petr Jan Juracka/SPL Materials science 29 October 2020 A standard laboratory tool allows researchers to produce two potentially dangerous metals and to observe them as they form. Lithium and sodium are highly reactive
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Rosetta’s lander Philae on the surface of a comet (artist’s impression).Credit: ESA/ATG medialab The chaotic crash-landing of a robotic spacecraft called Philae has yielded serendipitous insights into the softness of comets. In 2014, the European Space Agency’s pioneering lander touched down on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, after a ten-year journey aboard its mothership, Rosetta. But rather than
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Scientists say reforestation in tropical forest and savannah biomes in Africa must be done properly. Otherwise, they may do more harm than good. According to Université de Montréal geography department visiting researcher Julie Aleman, the state of ecosystems should be taken into consideration in planning for reforestation in the sub-Saharan region of Africa. Savannah versus tropical forest According to Aleman, all the regions they have studied
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Hear the latest from the world of science, brought to you by Benjamin Thompson and Noah Baker. Your browser does not support the audio element. Download MP3 In this episode: 00:59 The ethics of creating consciousness Brain organoids, created by culturing stem cells in a petri dish, are a mainstay of neuroscience research. But as
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Flying to conduct fieldwork is one reason climate researchers might travel more than other scientists.Credit: Andrew McCaren/LNP/Shutterstock In recent years, a growing number of climate-change researchers have made the conscious decision to reduce their carbon footprints by avoiding air travel or flying less. But an analysis suggests that, despite these efforts, climate researchers travel and
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The collecting arm on NASA’s OSIRIS-REx craft plunged as far as 48 centimetres into asteroid Bennu’s surface.Credit: NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona NASA overachieves during asteroid sampling NASA’s OSIRIS-REx mission exceeded expectations when it grabbed rocks and dirt off the surface of the asteroid Bennu on 20 October. The spacecraft gathered so much material that several rocks
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With 38 time zones worldwide, juggling the timings of virtual conferences to suit everyone can be a tricky task.Credit: Adapted from Getty Back in 2019, travelling to a conference many time zones away was difficult, but the content of the posters, the roar of the crowd and a few shots of caffeine were usually enough
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In Alysson Muotri’s laboratory, hundreds of miniature human brains, the size of sesame seeds, float in Petri dishes, sparking with electrical activity. These tiny structures, known as brain organoids, are grown from human stem cells and have become a familiar fixture in many labs that study the properties of the brain. Muotri, a neuroscientist at
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For decades, asbestos was considered an indestructible substance used in various industries due to its insulating and heat-resistant properties. The naturally occurring mineral once considered a miracle, is now turning into an infamous public health menace. The inhalation or ingestion of microscopic asbestos fibers could lead to serious health issues including lung cancer, bronchial cancer,
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A new study into the Portland Gales Creek Fault revealed that the fault could produce a major earthquake in the region of a magnitude 7.1. to 7.4, which could damage properties and potentially threaten lives in the Portland metro region. Researchers assured that this major earthquake is not likely to happen very soon. Portland Gales
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The plastic tubes winding through my workspace at the Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine, deliver fluids, nutrients and therapeutics to mouse hearts. The still-beating hearts, each the size of a pea, tell us much about heart disease as well as about the processes of regeneration and repair. On this day, I was studying a
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Changing seasons might affect the transmission of SARS-CoV-2, but researchers say it’s too early to tell.Credit: Beata Zawrzel/NurPhoto/Getty Winter is fast approaching in the Northern Hemisphere, and researchers warn that COVID-19 outbreaks are likely to get worse, especially in regions that don’t have the virus’s spread under control. “This virus is going to have a
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Human antibodies attacking the coronavirus (artist’s impression).Credit: Science Lab/Alamy When US President Donald Trump was ill with COVID-19, his physicians administered a bevy of medications — some proven, others experimental. But there is one that the president has hailed as a “cure”: a cocktail of coronavirus antibodies produced by Regeneron Pharmaceuticals in Tarrytown, New York.
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An electoral worker prepares to process ballots at the Miami-Dade County Election Department in Florida, a battleground state with a history of contested election results.Credit: Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty As election day approaches and COVID-19 cases surge in the United States, debate rages over how Americans should vote fairly and safely. Because of the pandemic,
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In a new study, researchers have discovered that the Elkhorn corals fight and resist reef diseases actively. Their findings show that corals have a capacity for a core immunity response to various disease types. The Importance and Role of Immunity We have become more acutely aware of our immune system’s importance, and role as the entire world struggles against
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Credit: Adapted from Getty Last month in the United Kingdom, we entered the promised land when my children, after a 150-day absence, returned to their school in London. As with most much-anticipated events, except perhaps an end to the pandemic, it didn’t quite live up to expectations. The first change was the silence in my
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Scientists have now found a way to upcycle polyethylene plastic and turn them into useful molecules efficiently and cheaply, which can reduce plastic waste.  The world’s plastic problem The Earth is now burdened with 8.3B tons of plastic waste, virtually all the plastics produced since it was invented. This ever-growing waste has no technological means
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Credit: Adapted from Getty Like many graduate students around the world, the COVID-19 pandemic forced me to stay at home and analyse data instead of working in the laboratory. To take a break from the mind-numbing data mining and to remind myself of the good old days of lab work, I started to watch some
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Environmental science experts warn of a looming disaster after wildfires have been contained: a deadly landslide that may be triggered by even a modest rainfall, the new UC Riverside research said. According to James Gullinger, an environmental science doctoral student and the author of the study, when the fires move through a watershed, waxy seals
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Credit: Tad Theimer Joseph (Joe) Connell altered both what and how ecologists study. Tree by tree, coral by coral, barnacle by barnacle, he saw patterns and processes across diverse ecosystems. Simply and with incontrovertible evidence, he demonstrated that interactions such as competition and predation could determine where species lived. Before his classic experiments on Scotland’s
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Credit: Sam Chivers When scientists, public-health bodies and governments around the world warn that antimicrobial resistance is the next great health crisis, they have good reason. Since the 1960s, bacteria and other microorganisms have become increasingly resistant to antimicrobial drugs, leading to more and more people dying. Drug-resistant diseases kill around 700,000 people each year,
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It is said that many residential areas in the Western US are at risk for wildfires, yet they are usually undisclosed to buyers by real estate agents, the sellers, and the government. The Montanos’ Experience Last August, Jennifer Montano, and her family lost their home in Vacaville in California from the LNU Lightning Complex fires, so-called because they were named after Cal Fire, of the
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Hello Nature readers, would you like to get this Briefing in your inbox free every day? Sign up here The diabolical ironclad beetle (Phloeodes diabolicus) is notoriously tough.Credit: Alice Abela Material scientists have discovered what makes the diabolical ironclad beetle (Phloeodes diabolicus) almost uncrushable. Scans showed that sections of the beetle’s exoskeleton lock together like
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Scientists are fascinated by the formidable exoskeleton of the “uncrushable“ Diabolical Ironclad Beetle, which may have industrial applications for making materials with exceptional mechanical strength and toughness for use in aeronautics and construction. An Amazing Species of Beetle Researchers have found this beetle to have such a strong exoskeleton that they began to study its material to find ways of applying
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The feathered dinosaur Ambopteryx longibrachium (artist’s impression) was inept at gliding and incapable of powered flight. Credit: Gabriel Ugueto Palaeontology 22 October 2020 Little bat-like dinosaurs could glide — but only just. It is one of the enduring wonders of evolution that natural selection can produce complex traits such as flight. But that doesn’t mean
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1. Roulois, D. et al. DNA-demethylating agents target colorectal cancer cells by inducing viral mimicry by endogenous transcripts. Cell 162, 961–973 (2015). CAS  PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar  2. Chiappinelli, K. B. et al. Inhibiting DNA methylation causes an interferon response in cancer via dsRNA including endogenous retroviruses. Cell 162, 974–986 (2015). CAS  PubMed 
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Researchers are currently undertaking a program for restoring seagrasses, which also rejuvenated the marine life in Virginia coastal bays. All over the world in all continents except Antarctica, there are over 70 seagrass species. They occur in shallow waters, and in Virginia, eelgrasses (scientific name: Zostera marina) are used as habitat by bay scallops and fishes. They also maintain barrier islands and keep
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The diabolical ironclad beetle (Phloeodes diabolicus) is notoriously tough.Credit: Alice Abela Scans reveal what makes beetle ‘uncrushable’ They don’t call it the diabolical ironclad beetle for nothing. Phloeodes diabolicus, a rugged insect native to western North America, has an almost supernatural ability to resist compression and blunt hits. Now, 3D scans have revealed that layered
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