Nature

NATURE PODCAST 22 September 2021 The floating sensors inspired by seeds How tiny seed-like sensors could monitor the environment, and the latest from the Nature Briefing. Benjamin Thompson & Noah Baker Benjamin Thompson View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Noah Baker View author publications You can also
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Download PDF At the age of 92, Violet dies while out on a nature walk. One moment, she is bending over a prairie mallow, the next, she is hunched in the dirt, pain shooting through her chest. The hike was billed as a sabbatical from technology, so there are no hover-cams or instant media updaters,
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According to reports on recent discoveries in a Cambodian wildlife sanctuary, eight eggs of one of the world’s rarest crocodile species were discovered in a nature sanctuary in eastern Cambodia, increasing hope for the species’ long-term survival. The officials discovered the critically endangered crocodiles in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. The newborn Siamese crocodiles were discovered earlier this
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Around the world, night is marked by the male crickets’ chirps, sounds they make by rubbing raspy modified forewings together in an effort to attract females. But artificial lights can disrupt these melodies, experiments show1. Access options Access through your institution Change institution Buy or subscribe Subscribe to Journal Get full journal access for 1
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Firefighters wrap aluminum blankets all over ancient trees, including the 275-foot Earth’s biggest tree by volume – General Sherman, as fires engulf world-famous Sequoia National Park in California. (Photo : Getty Images) Wildfire in Sequoia National Park  Firefighters have been making a lot of effort to protect California’s prominent groves of giant sequoias as numerous
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In 2006, school kids in New Zealand discovered the fossilized remains of a penguin the size of a ten-year-old child. The giant bird turns out to be a new species of penguin that, thanks to its long legs, was taller than any of its modern relatives1. Access options Access through your institution Change institution Buy
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Stunning reliefs of camels in a rock formation in Saudi Arabia are far older than was first thought: they were carved more than 7,000 years ago, when the climate of Arabian Peninsula was markedly cooler and wetter than it is today1. Access options Access through your institution Change institution Buy or subscribe Subscribe to Journal
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The Biden administration aims to protect workers and communities from severe heat following an extremely hot summer that incited an aggressive wildfire aggravated by drought which led to hundreds of deaths from the Pacific Northwest to hurricane-impacted Louisiana. (Photo : Getty Images) The Silent Killer  Under a plan publicized on Monday, the departments of Labor,
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Reefs have been in danger for a long time, but new research published today in the journal One Earth analyzes coral losses throughout the world. Since the 1950s, half of coral reefs have been destroyed, according to the study. Coral reefs and the diversity of fish species they sustain are in significant drop from Australia’s
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BOOK REVIEW 20 September 2021 A meander around many circulatory systems Of hearts, and myriad other ways natural selection has hit on to sustain multicellular life. Henry Nicholls 0 Henry Nicholls Henry Nicholls is a science journalist based in London. View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Share
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NEWS 20 September 2021 Australian funder backflips on controversial preprint ban Scientists welcome the move, but say the funder should have gone further by also reconsidering grant applications previously ruled ineligible. Clare Watson Clare Watson View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Share on Twitter Share on Twitter
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NATURE BRIEFING 16 September 2021 Daily briefing: How blue food can help feed the world How aquatic foods such as fish, shellfish and seaweed can help build healthy, sustainable and equitable food systems. Plus, preliminary evidence that SARS-CoV-2 might have spilled from animals to people multiple times. Flora Graham Flora Graham View author publications You
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CAREER COLUMN 17 September 2021 Stop undervaluing smaller institutions Far from being inferior, smaller universities can outstrip elite ones in research training and promoting inclusivity. Daphne S. Ling 0 & Kim M. Gerecke 1 Daphne S. Ling Daphne S. Ling is a neuroscience PhD student at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. You can
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COVID-19 has been found in the lions and tigers at the National Zoo in Washington, D.C. According to the zoo’s announcement on Friday, six African lions, a Sumatran tiger, and two Amur tigers all tested positive for the coronavirus. That implies the animals passed laboratory tests, but the United States Department of Agriculture must verify the
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CAREER COLUMN 16 September 2021 Discovering allyship at a historically Black university Adrienne Nugent’s postdoctoral programme at Hampton University showed her what it felt like to be a member of a minority group on a committee. Adrienne Nugent 0 Adrienne Nugent Adrienne Nugent is a clinical genomics scientist at Invitae, a biotechnology company in San
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NEWS 16 September 2021 Did the coronavirus jump from animals to people twice? A preliminary analysis of viral genomes suggests the COVID-19 pandemic might have multiple animal origins – but the findings still have to be peer reviewed. Smriti Mallapaty Smriti Mallapaty View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google
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In the Earth’s atmosphere, there is a persistent, heat-absorbing particle that does not like water at first, absorbs light, and takes its time going on called ‘black carbon.’ Numerous studies show reducing black carbon emissions reduces near-term global warming, increases agricultural yields, and reduces premature mortality. The Heat-Absorbing Particles in The Earth’s Atmosphere   Black
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Targeting genome-editing tools to the right part of the body could become much easier thanks to delivery vehicles made from a viral protein shell1. Access options Access through your institution Change institution Buy or subscribe Subscribe to Journal Get full journal access for 1 year 199,00 € only 3,90 € per issue Subscribe Tax calculation
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According to a groundbreaking new study published in Nature Food, the world’s food systems are responsible for more than one-third of global anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions generated by human activities, with the exploitation of animals for meat creating double the pollution as producing plant-based meals. Emissions of Greenhouse Gases Coming from Food Production System  
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CORRESPONDENCE 14 September 2021 Afghanistan: conflict risks local and global health Muhammad Jawad Noon  ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-3639-0242 0 Muhammad Jawad Noon Georg August University of Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany. View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Share via
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The COVID-19 pandemic forced legions of workers to move from centralized offices to kitchen tables. An analysis of the activities of employees at one major technology firm suggests that widespread remote working can curb real-time communication and reduce collaboration between groups1. Access options Access through your institution Change institution Buy or subscribe Subscribe to Journal
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CORRESPONDENCE 14 September 2021 Africa: invest in local manufacturing of COVID-19 vaccines James Ayodele 0 & Sylvain Boko 1 James Ayodele Coalition for Dialogue on Africa, African Union Commission, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Sylvain Boko Coalition for Dialogue on Africa, African Union
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Even without fizzy drinks and sweets, an extinct primate had the same dental problems as modern humans, according to fossils — providing the earliest known evidence of mammals with cavities1. Access options Access through your institution Change institution Buy or subscribe Subscribe to Journal Get full journal access for 1 year 199,00 € only 3,90
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