Nature

Epicurious, a digital cooking publication, will no longer publish beef-based recipes to encourage home chefs to be more environmentally conscious. The company calls it a “Pro-Planet Move.” (Photo : Edson Saldaña on Unsplash) Company Decision In an article published Monday, the Condé Nast-owned publication confirmed the move but also admitted that it “literally pulled the
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A rapidly spinning brown dwarf (pictured, artist’s impression) tends to have narrow atmospheric bands; the faster the spin, the thinner the bands. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech Astronomy and astrophysics 27 April 2021 Dim stars that have failed at fusion are masters of spin Three brown dwarfs whirl on their axes at a dizzying rate that might be
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COVID-19 deaths have peaked in Brazil during its recent surge.Credit: Joao Guimaraes/AFP/Getty More than a year after Brazil detected its first case of COVID-19, the country is facing its darkest phase of the pandemic yet. Researchers are devastated by the recent surge in cases and say that the government’s failure to follow science-based guidance in
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The snake worm is a worm that looks like a snake when it moves around. Despite that though, they can sometimes be confused with earthworms. This has become a problem because the recent surge of snake worm populations have become a great concern for American conservationists. Is a snake worm dangerous? For humans, they are
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When you see someone wearing gloves, you tend to think they’re protecting themselves from something. In my laboratory at the Pasteur Institute in Montevideo, Uruguay, we wear gloves to protect our samples from ourselves. We study RNA, and some of the enzymes in our skin can break those molecules down. I am a molecular biologist,
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Large-scale facilities such as this feedlot in Floresville, Texas, help to meet the global appetite for beef and other red meat, which remains strong despite the growing consumption of chicken and fish. Credit: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Agriculture 26 April 2021 Meat lovers worldwide pay climate little heed People are eating more poultry and fish — but
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The Large Hadron’s Collider LHCb detector, pictured, reported anomalies in the behaviour of muons, two weeks before the Muon g – 2 experiment announced a puzzling finding about muon magnetism.Credit: Peter Ginter/CERN Physicists should be ecstatic right now. Taken at face value, the surprisingly strong magnetism of the elementary particles called muons, revealed by an
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Professors and students of the University of Wyoming have identified an atypical belt of igneous rocks that extends for more than 2,000 miles from British Columbia, Canada, to Sonora, Mexico. The rock belt passes through Nevada, Idaho, southeast California, Arizona, and Montana. (Photo : Pixabay) Long Belts of Igneous Rocks   “Geoscientists normally relate long belts of
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Credit: Getty Personal statements — essays highlighting personal circumstances, qualities and achievements — are used extensively in science to evaluate candidates for jobs, awards and promotions. Five researchers offer tips for making yours stand out in a crowded and competitive market. STEVE OH: Convey personal qualities beyond academic interests Steve Oh is director of the
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Melina Masnatta, co-founder of Chicas en Tecnología, won a Nature award for her work. Credit: Catalina Bartolomé Melina Masnatta co-founded Chicas en Tecnología (CET), which translates to “girls in technology”, a non-profit organization based in Buenos Aires that helps to address the gender gap in science and technology. CET exposes women and girls to science
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Credit: Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty I am the only student on my PhD programme in genomics data science with an undergraduate degree in biology and philosophy. Initially, I saw these as separate fields: I was writing about theories of morality in one class and memorizing the Krebs cycle in another. It was only after picking up first-hand
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What if farm animal’s emotions could also be translated accurately through their faces, body language, and communication? Wageningen University & Research in the Netherlands made an attempt to do this. Experts are currently developing an AI system to measure the emotions of pigs and other animals. (Photo : Mali Maeder) Shortcomings in Data collection  Someone
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Black researchers are making small gains in representation in the life sciences.Credit: Getty Members of minority ethnic groups have made only modest inroads into US science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) positions in recent years, according to an analysis of nearly 20 million people. The analysis was conducted by the Pew Research Center, a non-profit
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Benjamin Thompson and Ewen Callaway discuss COVID-19 vaccine trials in young children. Your browser does not support the audio element. Download MP3 As COVID-19 vaccine roll-outs continue, attentions are turning to one group: children. While research suggests that children rarely develop severe forms of COVID-19, scientists still believe they could play a key role in
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Oleander is a common landscape if not house plant in places with warmer climates, and with good reason: this almost foolproof evergreen shrub comes in a wide range of shapes, sizes, adaptability, and flower color. However, before you plant, you should be aware of oleander toxicity and the possibility of oleander poisoning. Related Article: Gardening 101:
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In this webcast, now available to view on demand, researchers talk about their mental health and how they look after themselves and others in the absence of normal support systems. Burnout is rampant in academia, so this topic remains as crucial now as when the session was first broadcast, last year. Ellen Wehrens, a scientific
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In an interview conducted by Technology Networks to the Scientific Research Director of British American Tobacco (BAT), David O’Reilly, PhD, it was confirmed that there was an undergoing preclinical testing for COVID-19 vaccine using tobacco plant as a “biomanufacturing factory.” This simply means that tobacco plants were being used as a vessel where a key
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The pandemic has presented obstacles and upsides for researchers globally.Credit: Getty Nearly all respondents (97%) to a global survey of 2,000 researchers reported that the COVID-19 pandemic has affected their work — and half reported ‘significant’ impact — but most are staying productive despite the disruptions. Those are among the key findings of a study
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A mixture of solitary and clustered uranium atoms (artificially coloured). Scientists have produced an ultralight uranium atom with only 122 neutrons. Credit: Dr Mitsuo Ohtsuki/Science Photo Library Atomic and molecular physics 22 April 2021 The world’s lightest uranium atom reveals nuclear secrets A flyweight isotope of uranium helps to shed light on a fundamental form
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Community-health volunteers in India prepare to take tuberculosis samples to microscopy centres. Worldwide, an additional 500,000 people may have died from the disease in 2020.Credit: Sanjay Baid/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock This month, the world passed a devastating milestone, with three million deaths attributed to COVID-19. As the World Health Organization (WHO) has reported, globally, the pandemic remains on
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Founded by Leonardo DiCaprio in the early 2000s, Appian Way Productions has certainly come a long way. After the massive success of The Wolf of Wall Street and winning critical Oscar acclaim with The Revenant, they have gradually built another reputation for documentaries highly focused on sustainability. If you have ever watched Cowspiracy on Netflix, Appian
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Algae fills the Paktajokka River in northern Sweden. Photosynthesis in the river means that its daytime and night-time carbon emissions differ substantially. Credit: Gerard Rocher-Ros Biogeochemistry 21 April 2021 Rivers give off stealth carbon at night Emissions made under cover of darkness account for much of the carbon flux from flowing waters. Share on Twitter
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Last week, seven European countries pledged to stop important support for fossil-fuel projects abroad. They join the United States and other European countries in stopping funding for energy infrastructure projects in poor countries that depend on coal, gas and oil. This blanket ban will entrench poverty in regions such as sub-Saharan Africa, but do little
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What started as a little pest investigation turned into a surprising (and somewhat scary) discovery of an entirely new species of amphibious centipede in Okinawa, Japan. This specie was aptly named after a local dragon god. Researchers at the Tokyo Metropolitan University received a little-known piece of news about strangely large, amphibious centipedes attacking freshwater
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290 million kilometers away, NASA’s Ingenuity helicopter has taken the first step towards a new type of space exploration. Hovering 3 meters above the Martian surface before rotating 90 degrees and safely landing, this was the first powered flight on another planet. In this video we explore the challenges of this achievement and ask what
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As a scientific-instruments engineer, I work on aircraft used by the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research for research flights at the North and South poles. They are modernized aeroplanes from the 1940s, with converted cabins that can power science equipment and capture data on sea ice and other climate-related phenomena. In my
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In the Article, we studied 71 landfall events. For each event, we analysed the data of hurricane intensities and locations corresponding to the first four synoptic times past landfall (0000 utc, 0600 utc, 1200 utc and 1800 utc). From the intensities, we computed the decay timescale, and from the locations, we computed the translation speed, coastline-perpendicular
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This Nature Careers webinar is now available to view as video-on-demand. In the 60-minute session, three speakers share their advice, approaches and opinions on peer review, before spending some time answering questions from Nature’s readers. First, we hear from Mathew Stiller-Reeve, a scientific consultant based in Norway. He outlines his structured approach to peer review.
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